Casualties of the Supreme Court wars

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Reflecting on the continuing controversies surround-ing the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, I cannot help but recall Sen. Susan Collins articulating out loud the duplicitous position previously murmured by some Republicans in response to the sworn testimony of Christine Blasey Ford, who alleged she had been sexually assaulted by Justice Kavanaugh. Ms. Ford said she was “100 percent” certain that Justice Kavanaugh had attacked her when they were teenagers in the 1980s. Although Ms. Ford is a distinguished research psychologist and college professor at two respected universities, Ms. Collins  pronounced her crazy. Read more >>>

 

Muslim, African-American, Native American, Trans: Meet the pioneering women running for office in the midterms

Yahoo

As you may have noticed, the “Year of the Woman” catchphrase — originally used in 1992, when voters elected more women to Congress than ever before in the wake of Anita Hill’s allegations against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas — is back with a vengeance. Read more>>>

Muslim, African-American, Native American, Trans: Meet the pioneering women running for office in the midterms

Yahoo

As you may have noticed, the “Year of the Woman” catchphrase — originally used in 1992, when voters elected more women to Congress than ever before in the wake of Anita Hill’s allegations against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas — is back with a vengeance. Read more >>>

 

Women hold the power this Election Day

STL Jewish Light

First, women marched in St. Louis, Washington, D.C., and in thousands of other cities. The next year, they did it again because the dangerous consequences of the current White House administration’s policies were crystal clear.

And now a record number of women are running for political office — for Congress and for legislative seats here in Missouri.  It didn’t take long after the 2016 general election for many of us to get the message: “If you’re not at the table, you’re most likely on the menu.” Read more>>>

Will 2018 become a “Year of the Woman”?

The Economist

THE prediction that 2018 will become another “Year of the Woman” has become something of a cliché. Even before allegations of sexual assault imperilled Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court, the record number of women running for congressional office heralded a boost to the number of female lawmakers not seen since 1992, the year after Anita Hill testified against Clarence Thomas. But a closer look at what is happening in the mid-term campaigns’ closing days shows how far Capitol Hill will have to go to reach anything approaching gender parity after November 6th. Read more>>>

 

Women hold the power this Election Day

STL Jewish Light

First, women marched in St. Louis, Washington, D.C., and in thousands of other cities. The next year, they did it again because the dangerous consequences of the current White House administration’s policies were crystal clear.

And now a record number of women are running for political office — for Congress and for legislative seats here in Missouri.  It didn’t take long after the 2016 general election for many of us to get the message: “If you’re not at the table, you’re most likely on the menu.” Read more>>

Will 2018 become a “Year of the Woman”?

The Economist

The prediction that 2018 will become another “Year of the Woman” has become something of a cliché. Even before allegations of sexual assault imperilled Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court, the record number of women running for congressional office heralded a boost to the number of female lawmakers not seen since 1992, the year after Anita Hill testified against Clarence Thomas. But a closer look at what is happening in the mid-term campaigns’ closing days shows how far Capitol Hill will have to go to reach anything approaching gender parity after November 6th. Read more >>>

The ‘Year of the Woman’ 2.0 is approaching

The Hill

In late August on a long trip back to D.C., I found myself captivated by a podcast featuring Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) talking about her 1992 election to the United States Senate. That year is forever etched in the history books as the “Year of the Woman,” made famous by the record number of women elected to the Senate in the year following Anita Hill’s testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.

As the 15-year-old daughter of two politically active parents in 1991, I vividly remember watching long stretches of the hearings. I was captivated by Anita Hill’s courage, strength and bravery. Read more >>>

Kerry Washington: “Anita Hill taught me what fearlessness really is”

Fast Company

Kerry Washington is not one to mince words, especially when she’s performing eight nights a week on Broadway, feeling under the weather, and yet still has the fortitude to engage in a frank conversation about gender power dynamics in front of hundreds of people.

During the opening keynote of the Fast Company Innovation Festival in New York City today, the Scandal star was asked about what she’s learned from working with some of the most powerful women in entertainment and elsewhere. One name that came up was Anita Hill, whom Washington played in the HBO movie Confirmation—which focuses on Hill’s sexual harassment allegation against U.S. Supreme Court Judge Clarence Thomas in the early 1990s. The real-life Hill worked as a consultant on the movie. Read more >>>

Experts weigh potential impact of Kavanaugh confirmation on November election

The Badger Herald

Watching Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court, Rep. Chris Taylor, D-Madison was disgusted and upset.

Taylor said she felt like a first-year law student again, watching Anita Hill bring forward allegations of sexual misconduct against Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Read more >>>

 

 

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