“Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence”

Professor Hill talks about her new book, “Believing.” Reviews say: “Hill’s new book defies boundaries by bringing together elements of memoir with law, social analysis, and polemic.It’s delivered with the precision of a powerful lawyer and the vulnerability of someone who became a target of merciless media scrutiny after testifying to being sexually harassed by now–Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. With searing insight, Hill shows how much and how little things have changed since 1991. Her book gives hope, inspires activism, and discourages complacency.” Listen now

In a new podcast, Anita Hill and Christine Blasey Ford converse for the 1st time

It’s been 30 years since Anita Hill testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee that then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her when they worked together. Thomas denied the allegation. Listen now

Anita Hill on R. Kelly and Gender Violence

Anita Hill has dedicated her life to tackling gender violence, after coming to national prominence 30 years ago with her testimony that then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her. She joins Christiane Amanpour to discuss her new book “Believing: Our Thirty Year Journey to End Gender Violence.” Watch here>>>

Georgia Republicans push to have Clarence Thomas statue at Capitol

The statehouse grounds features statues and portraits of native Georgians who have achieved great accomplishments. Some want to include Thomas.

Georgia Republicans are pushing to have a statue of Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas installed outside of the state’s capitol building. Read more>>>

Anita Hill: Gender violence is ‘a problem that is hurting all of us’

ABC’s Linsey Davis speaks with legal scholar Anita Hill on her new book “Believing: Our 30-Year Journey to End Gender Violence,” in which she talks about her activism since her testimony 30 years ago. Watch here

‘There is no perfect victim’: Anita Hill refuses to believe a myth that lets perpetrators off the hook

October marks three decades since Anita Hill testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee that Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her when he was her boss at the Department of Education and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
A Supreme Court nominee, the conservative Thomas was confirmed by a thin margin of 52-48. Hill was pilloried. Read more>>>

Anita Hill on Fresh Air with Terry Gross

In 1991, Anita Hill testified that Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her. Thomas was confirmed regardless. Since then, another Supreme Court justice, Brett Kavanaugh, has joined the bench, despite Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony that he sexually assaulted her. We talk with Hill about how her life and work has changed over the last 30 years, how she wants the confirmation process to change, and President Biden’s apology for how she was treated in the ’91 hearings. Her new memoir is ‘Believing.’ “There is victory in being able to come forward and state what has happened to you,” she says. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews Anthony Doerr’s new novel, ‘Cloud Cuckoo Land.’

Listen here

Anita Hill Wants More Than an Apology

This October, it will be 30 years since Anita Faye Hill, a 35-year-old law professor from Lone Tree, Oklahoma, came forward to testify that Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her when the two worked together at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Despite Hill’s searing testimony, which was met by derision and insult from Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee and paralysis and ineptitude from the Democrats in charge (led by future president Joe Biden), Thomas would get confirmed to fill the seat left empty by retiring Justice Thurgood Marshall, swinging the balance of the Supreme Court perilously rightward. But Hill’s testimony served as a kind of fulcrum, marking an enormous and uneasy turn in America’s recognition of gender inequity and injustice. Read More>>>

Anita Hill Has Some Perspective to Offer

Thirty years after she testified before the Senate, the law professor talks about the experience, sexual harassment and her growing impatience with the slow pace of change. Read More>>>

Why Kamala Harris and ‘Firsts’ Matter, and Where They Fall Short

Kamala Harris will forever have “first” attached to her name — the first woman, the first Black American and the first person of South Asian descent to serve as vice president of the United States.

If the Biden administration’s choices for cabinet members and senior officials are approved, many of them will also be firsts — including the first Black, Latino, Native American, female and openly gay and transgender leaders to serve in various positions. Read more>>>

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